ALTERNATIVE FLOORING OPTIONS TO CONSIDER WHEN RENOVATING

There are lots of things to consider when selecting the right
flooring for your house. Allow us to simplify your options…


When we think of our flooring options, it’s usually some combination of timber floorboards,
carpet and tiles. However, flooring technology has evolved to create a number of options that
may look familiar, but have been improved to be more hard-wearing, resilient, flexible and less
expensive.

To avoid boggling your brain with options, we’ve narrowed in on some of the most recent and
adaptable flooring options for your next renovation.

HYBRID PLANKS

Hybrid flooring is a fairly new product that entered the market around 2017.

It’s a type of floating floorboard made from multiple materials compacted together, explains
Carpet Court’s National Merchandise Manager for Carpet and Hard Flooring, Brett Talbot.

“Hybrid is made up of a rigid core board, which provides water and moisture resistant properties once it’s installed in your home,” Brett says.

“It’s designed to take the best features of laminate, in terms of scratch resistance, vinyl, in terms of water resistance, and timber, in terms of looks.”

For these reasons, it’s a great, durable product — especially if you have pets or young kids.
Another benefit of hybrid flooring is that it’s fairly easy to install. As a floating floorboard, it can
be laid on most existing flat, hard surfaces.

“I would still recommend having a professional installer come and do it, but most jobs are done
in a day or two,” Brett adds.

Finally, thanks to a thin inbuilt underlay, hybrid flooring can assist with noise insulation.

HYBRID TILES

Tile flooring can look stunning, but they can be expensive and difficult to install. But did you
know there’s a ’tile’ that’s easier to lay and just as – if not more – gorgeous?

Carpet Court has a Hybrid Tile range called Elements that resemble stone, terrazzo, marble and
concrete looks.

“This could be a good alternative for a customer that wants tiles,” says Brett. “Installing tiles can
be quite the process as it can be messy and expensive. We’re trying to eliminate the cost and
time factor.”

There are also benefits regarding slip-resistance and noise reduction when compared with
some regular tiles.

Furthermore, in an area like the kitchen – where you’re on your feet a lot – this hybrid product
can be more flexible and easier under foot than more rigid, regular tiles.

Hybrid tiles are a floating floor and laid similar to floating floorboards with a ‘click and lock’
system. They also have an inbuilt underlay for added ease.

LAMINATE

Laminate is more affordable than hybrid and offers another alternative to timber. Due to the low cost and upkeep requirements, it can be a common option for investment properties.
“Laminate is an entry-level, cheaper flooring option,” Brett says. “It’s very hard wearing and also
looks quite fresh.”

A good laminate is scratch resistant and very easy to clean. Also a floating floor, it’s easy and
inexpensive to install.

It comes in a variation of colours, shapes and styles, including a chevron style, where the boards are laid in a V-shaped, parquet formation.

CARPET

Of course you know carpet is an option. But are you aware of the latest carpet technology and
how to choose the right carpet for your needs?

The type of carpet you choose will most likely come down to your budget and lifestyle.
For instance, how much wear and tear is your carpet likely to suffer? Are you using this carpet in the living room of an investment property or in your own bedroom?

Costs do vary with the least expensive option typically being a synthetic material. Meanwhile,
wool is top of the range.

If you have pets, consider a product like Carpet Court’s UltraPET carpets, which are easy to
clean should a dog or cat have an ‘accident’ indoors.

Brett notes that carpet could potentially end up being the least expensive option as it is the
cheapest to install.

Interestingly, carpet is having a bit of a renaissance in the home.

“Around three or four years ago, there was a real trend [to decorate] homes entirely in a hard
floor, hybrid or laminate,” Brett shared.

“However, we’re seeing a bit of a resurgence of carpet, particularly in bedrooms [as well as in]
theatre rooms.

“People are at home a lot more and aren’t going out [as frequently to] places like cinemas. The
theatre room is back and carpet tends to be the go in there.”
There you have it – get your theatre room ready for a plush new floor!

Originally published on realestate.com.au as Alternative flooring options to consider when renovating.